Our advisory board

Advisory board

Asher Minns

Asher is currently the Executive Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of East Anglia, UK. He has also worked for world-renowned Imperial College, Oxford University, and international Future Earth. With extensive experience at world-leading organisations as a skilled science communicator and leader, he specialises in engaging with key influencers and audiences regionally, nationally and internationally, inside and outside of academia. He holds interdisciplinary qualifications across science communication, ecology, and radar engineering.

Advisory board

Benjamin Franta

Benjamin is a a PhD Candidate in History at Stanford University, where he studies the history of climate change politics. He has a separate PhD in Applied Physics from Harvard University, a JD from Stanford Law School, and is a pending member of the California Bar. He studies the history of climate science and denial, disinformation, and delay, as well as analysing legal strategies for holding fossil fuel producers accountable for the climate effects of their products. His research and writing has appeared in Nature Climate Change, The Guardian, Project Syndicate, and elsewhere, has been cited in the US Congressional Record, and translated into ten languages.

Advisory board

Chukwumerije Okereke

Chukwumerije is a globally recognised leading scholar on climate governance and international development with expertise in climate justice, national green growth transition in Africa, climate adaptation, business climate strategies, environmental policy, advising governments, corporates and international institutions (e.g. UN, African Union). He is Professor of Global Climate and Environmental Governance and Director of the Center for Climate and Development, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Ndufu-Alike, Nigeria. Previously, he was a Professor of Environment and Development at the University of Reading, UK. Chukwumerije’s work is devoted to understanding the mix of policies, strategies, and institutional arrangements that can help to address climate change and natural resource degradation in Africa in the context of sustainable development and Africa’s structural economic transformation.

Advisory board

Feisal Rahman

Feisal is a postdoctoral research associate with UKRI Global Challenges Research Fund project Living Deltas Hub in the Department of Geography at Durham University. Trained in environmental engineering, he works at the intersection of natural science, social science, and public policy. His research to date has focused on climate change adaptation, adaptation finance, water quality, and delta resilience. He has also held positions as Assistant Professor in the department of Environmental Science at Independent University, Bangladesh and as a Research Coordinator at the International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD).


Advisory board

Julia Steinberger

Julia researches and teaches in the interdisciplinary areas of ecological economics and industrial ecology. She has been Professor of Societal Challenges of Climate Change at the University of Lausanne since 2020. Before that, she worked at the University of Leeds, and was a Senior Researcher at the Institute of Social Ecology in Vienna (SEC). Her research examines the connections between resource use (energy and materials, greenhouse gas emissions) and societal performance (economic activity and human wellbeing). She is a Lead Author for the IPCC’s 6th Assessment Report with Working Group 3. She has published over 60 internationally peer-reviewed articles since 2009 in journals including Nature Climate Change, Nature Energy, Nature Sustainability, WIRES-Climate Change, Environmental Science & Technology and Environmental Research Letters.

Advisory board

Kimberly Nicholas

Kimberly is Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at Lund University, Sweden. She has published over 55 articles on climate and sustainability in leading peer-reviewed journals; writes for publications such as The Guardian, Scientific American, Elle, and New Scientist; and is the author of UNDER THE SKY WE MAKE: How to be Human in a Warming World, and the monthly climate newsletter We Can Fix It. She researches the connections between people, land, and climate, with the goal of stewarding ecosystems to support a good life for everyone alive today, and leave a thriving planet for future generations. Born and raised on her family’s vineyard in Sonoma, California, Kimberly studied the effect of climate change on the California wine industry for her PhD in the Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources at Stanford University.

Advisory board

Robert Watson

Robert is a physical chemist specialising in atmospheric science issues and a leading authority on the science of climate change due to human activity. His research on halogen and hydroxyl free-radical reactions significantly informed models of how chlorofluorocarbons and other manmade chemicals deplete the Earth’s ozone layer. Robert's career spans research and advisory roles, including key roles with NASA, as a science policy adviser to US President Bill Clinton and at the World Bank. In the UK, Robert was Chief Scientific Adviser to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. He is a former Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and of the Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity Ecosystem Services (IPBES). Robert's many accolades include the 1993 AAAS Award for Scientific Freedom and Responsibility, the insignia of Honorary Companion of St. Michael and St. George in 2003, and the 2010 Asashi Blue Planet Prize. He was knighted in 2012 for his service to government.

Advisory board

Saleemul Huq

Saleemul is the Director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development (ICCCAD) and Professor at the Independent University Bangladesh as well as Associate of the International Institute on Environment and Development in the United Kingdom. He is an expert in adaptation to climate change in the most vulnerable developing countries and has been a lead author of the third , fourth and fifth assessment reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He also advises the Least Developed Countries group in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). He has published hundreds of scientific as well as popular articles and was recognised as one of the top 20 global influencers on climate change policy in 2019 and top scientist from Bangladesh on climate change science.

Advisory board

Vandana Shiva

Vandana is a world-renowned environmental thinker, activist, feminist, philosopher of science, writer and science policy advocate. Trained as a physicist at the University of Punjab, she completed her PhD at the University of Western Ontario, Canada. She later shifted to interdisciplinary research in science, technology and environmental policy. In 1982 she founded the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology (RFSTE), and two years later, Navdanya International, a movement in defence of biodiversity and small farmers. Vandana is a recipient of many awards, including in 1993 the Right Livelihood Award, and named among the top five 'Most Important People in Asia' by AsiaWeek in 2001. She is a prolific writer and author of numerous books and serves on the board of the International Forum on Globalization, and member of the executive committee of the World Future Council.

Advisory board

Vanessa Andreotti

Vanessa is a Professor in the University of British Columbia's department of educational studies and holds a Canada Research chair in Race, Inequalities and Global Change. She is one of the founders of the Gesturing Towards Decolonial Futures and is part of the coordination team of the Last Warning campaign. Her research examines historical and systemic patterns of reproduction of inequalities and how these limit or enable possibilities for collective existence and global change. Vanessa's academic work is committed to protecting the public role of the university as critic and conscience of society and as a space of independent, multi-voiced, critically informed and socially accountable debates about alternative futures.